deer

Deer That Visits Town Every Christmas Returns With An Arrow Through Its Head

In Kenora, Ontario, Canada, there is a thriving deer population. Over the last three years, however, one deer has set itself apart from the rest for its kind and approachable personality. Recently, Carrot the deer showed up for one of his regular visits with a bow through his head. (1)

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Town’s Favorite Deer Wounded By Arrow

Three years ago, a young fawn showed up in the town of Kenora, Ontario that was so friendly, the townspeople gave him a name: Carrot. Since then the deer has paid regular visits, specifically to Lee-Anne Carver and her partner, with whom he shares a particularly special bond. (1)

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Carver was incredibly distressed when earlier this month, Carrot showed up in her yard with an arrow through his head. She has been updating Carrot fans on the situation on the Carrot the Magic Deer and the Orange Hearts Club Facebook page.

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She first shared a video of the morning visit, where she was incredibly distressed over the arrow in Carrot’s head. In the caption, she explained that at first, there was no plan to remove the bolt out of fear that it would splinter and cause the deer further complications. (1)

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“I have also had a local hunting business owner writing to me explaining the bolt in detail,” she wrote. “As horrible as the injury is, it may now be saving Carrot’s life. Any attempt to remove it may cause severe bleeding (as the CTV National News article covered) or even nerve damage. It appears the bolt has cauterized the wound. Cutting the bolt also comes with a whole set of problems. Carrot is not going to stand still for that and, even if he did, the bolt is made out of carbon and it will splinter and shard, and those splinters can easily cause infection in Carrot.” (1)

Carrot the Magic Deer Worse Before Better

Carver continued to update the Facebook page every time she had visits from Carrot. On December 17, people from the Ministry of Natural Resources arrived to help the situation. The idea was to tranquilize Carrot so that they could cut off the top portion of the arrow, for his safety. (2)

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What happened next is somewhat unclear, however, Carver updated the Facebook page to announce that they were unable to cut the bolt but it had somehow sheared off on its own. She found the MNR in her backyard with Carrot, who they had darted again, to attempt to remove the bolt before a deadly infection could set in. (2)

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Image Credit: Carrot the Magic Deer Facebook Page

The team removed the bolt, injected Carrot with antibiotics to stave off infection, and tagged him for easier tracking should something go wrong. (2)

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Carver’s biggest fear is that Carrot would succumb to capture myopathy. This is a condition that occurs in wild animals when they are captured. Their inherent biological stress defenses fail, and often the result is death. (3)

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Deer are particularly sensitive creatures, so the following days were highly stressful for all of Carrot’s new global fan base, most of all Carver and her husband. Thankfully, Carrot survived the ordeal with the help of the capable people from the MNR and Carter, who was there to comfort him. (2)

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An Incredible Animal

Carrot is now back to health, and of course Carver and the rest of the Carrot the Deer lovers couldn’t be happier.

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Image Credit: Carrot the Magic Deer Facebook Page

Carver wrote this on Facebook about her wild friend:

“When I first met Carrot 3 years ago as a fawn, I knew he was different. There was something unidentifiable about him that was so profoundly peaceful. I have never been able to adequately describe what he did to my heart.” (2)

Carrot’s story has touched the lives of thousands around the world. Hopefully, he will live the rest of his life free of trauma, so he can continue to bring joy to everyone who has the pleasure of meeting him.

Keep Reading: I’ve slept in cardboard boxes, vans and trucks. Now I live with my three dogs in a 25-foot sailboat

References

  1. Carrot Visits This Morning.” Facebook.
  2. Carrot the Magic Deer and the Orange Heart Club.” Facebook.
  3. “Conserving wildlife in a changing world: Understanding capture myopathy—a malignant outcome of stress during capture and translocation.” Academic. Dorothy Breed, Leith C R Meyer, Johan C A Steyl, Amelia Goddard, Richard Burroughs, Tertius A Kohn. July 5, 2019.
Julie Hambleton
Freelance Writer
Julie Hambleton has a BSc in Food and Nutrition from the Western University, Canada, is a former certified personal trainer and a competitive runner. Julie loves food, culture, and health, and enjoys sharing her knowledge to help others make positive changes and live healthier lives.
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