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Can You Spot The Differences In These Portraits?

There are many versions of “spot the difference”. Many different artists, illustrators, and photographers have risen to the challenge of ever so slightly changing an image. It’s a little like meeting identical twins. At first glance, they look the same, but the harder you look — and the keener the eyes — you begin to notice slight differences. How fast are you able to notice the changes in these portraits? For a bonus challenge, set a stopwatch and see if you could beat your record!

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Can You Spot The Differences In These Portraits?

Portrait #1

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The Story Book by French painter William-Adolphe Bouguereau
Photo credits: Los Angeles County Museum of Art

Firstly, this beautiful portrait is by French painter William-Adolphe Bouguereau in 1877. Many theorize that this portrait, called “The Story Book” was inspired by one of his children, who died at a young age from disease. Bouguereau’s work is admired for its simplicity with earnest emotion. [1]

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Portrait #2

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“Indian Girl in White Blanket” was painted in 1917 by American painter Robert Henri. Julianita, a young student posed for the portrait with blankets with Native American-inspired patterns. She was in nine other of Henri’s paintings. The artist was hoping to depict Native American life aesthetically and expressively. [2]

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Portrait #3

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This is an original painting by Cecilia Beaux in 1921. It’s called “Sita and Sarita” and it’s a stunning depiction of Beaux’s cousin, Sarah Allibone Leavitt, with her black cat. Beaux is known for her bold technique as well as embuing her female portraits with a certain wit and intelligence, instead of rendering them as just beautiful. [3]

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Portrait #4

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Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun painted this commissioned portrait of Madame du Barry in 1782. Jeanne Bécu, also known as Comtesse du Barry, was the last Maîtresse-en-titre of Louis XV. She was later killed in the Reign of Terror during the French Revolution. [4]

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Portrait #5

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And finally, in 1806, American painter Joshua Johnson created “Grace Allison McCurdy (Mrs. Hugh McCurdy) and Her Daughters, Mary Jane and Letitia Grace,” named after those depicted. [5]

The Answer Key:

So if you liked this batch of “spot the difference” pictures, you’ll enjoy these other puzzles that will test your attention to detail:

Sources

  1. “The Story Book, 1877.Artsy.Net.
  2. “Indian Girl in White Blanket.National Gallery of Art
  3. “Sita and Sarita, c. 1921National Gallery of Art
  4. “Madame du Barry.” National Gallery of Art
  5. “Grace Allison McCurdy (Mrs. Hugh McCurdy) and Her Daughters, Mary Jane and Letitia Grace.National Gallery of Art
Sarah Biren
Freelance Writer
Sarah is a baker, cook, author, and blogger living in Toronto. She believes that food is the best method of healing and a classic way of bringing people together. In her spare time, Sarah does yoga, reads cookbooks, writes stories, and finds ways to make any type of food in her blender.
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