Dog sitting on a fence while and eye level with a horse

Jon Stewart’s beautiful 45-acre farm is a safe haven for abused animals

Jon Stewart is well-known for his career in comedy but he is also a Good Samaritan who uses his wealth and resources to help those in need. In 2013, Jon Stewart and his wife, Tracey, bought the 12-acre Bufflehead Farm. They originally planned to turn it into an animal sanctuary, but they chose to purchase and develop the 45-acre Hockhockson Farm in Colts Neck for their organization. So they began to transform it into a safe haven for rescue animals. Tracey Stewart is an animal activist and best-selling author, and she states that the farm will take care of rescued sheep, cows, chickens, goats, and pigs.

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Jon and Tracey Stewart’s Farm For Rescued Animals

In 2017, the couple applied to officially make their farm an animal sanctuary and educational center. This was a big step toward their end goal.

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I’m just really pleased, not just with the outcome but also with the process of creating a project that would be amenable to what they do, but would still honor the spirit of the project,” said Stewart after the proceeding. “I thought the process itself was approached in a way that really gave us great comfort in the investment of time and money we were making into the community.” [1]

Jon and Tracey Stewart’s farm will also have educational programs and tours teaching animal care and sustainable farming for school programs. At first, these will be by appointment only, but the couple hopes to open the farm to the public eventually.

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“So much of the project is about community. So you want the community that you are invested in to want you to be there and to be invested in it as well,” Jon said. “You want it to be mutual love, not unrequited love.”

That year, Tracey Stewart released a book called Do Unto Animals that gives readers “insights into the secret lives of animals and the kindest ways to live with and alongside them.” Her goal is to encourage people to think of animals as individuals, not just food.

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If everyone did a bit more, if they fell in love a little bit more, so much could happen,” she said. “It doesn’t have to be going vegan. You can advocate for them… you can play music for them. I really hope people can connect with animals the way most of us did as children.[2]

Becoming a Farm Sanctuary

Right now, the farmhouse contains 9 bedrooms and 8 bathrooms. On the property are a pool, two cottages, a pond, six barns, five pastures, and a garage that holds five cars. Additionally, the Stewart’s plan to build a visitor’s center and a large parking lot. Hired farmhands will likely live in the two cottages. 

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As far as the animals go, the sanctuary focuses on rescuing abused farm animals. They plan to keep about four horses, six cows, two to four pigs, six to ten goals, two to four pigs, and up to 50 chickens. All of which would have most probably been slaughtered, but they could live out their natural lives in a safe environment at the farm.

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Tracey’s always real good about getting the animals to calm down and feel safe,” Jon has said. “I never know what she’s going to come back with. It’s usually OK, long as it’s not an animal of prey. We draw the line at panthers.

When Jon and Tracey Stewart’s farm finally opens, it will be partnered with Farm Sanctuary, a livestock rescue and advocacy nonprofit that began in 1986, with Tracey on the board. There are two other sanctuaries in California and one in upstate New York. [3]

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 “What Farm Sanctuary does is they do rescue and sanctuary for animals, and then without realizing it, they also do rescue and sanctuary for people,” she said in 2015 when they received the organization’s Gift of Life Award. “And I feel as though they’ve rescued me, and they’ve given me sanctuary for the rest of my life.” [4]

The Stewart’s farm is not yet open to the public, but they are already caring for abused farm animals who need them.

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Read: Robin Williams Apparently Made ‘Every Company He Worked For Hire Homeless People And Put Them To Work’

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Jon Stewart’s Philanthropy

The farm isn’t the only charity work Jon and Tracey Stewart are known for. They decided to do more with their farm than save animals; they decided to help the poor. So they founded the Hockhockson Farm Foundation in collaboration with Laurino Farms and the Red Bank-based nonprofit Lunch Break. Their Caring Sharing Agriculture program donates fresh products for families in need

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“You’ve got Hockhockson, all the great things they do with animals and now with veggies, and of course with Lunch Break, helping all the people in need,” Laurino said. “It was three groups that really do a lot, so it was perfect.[5]

Jon Stewart himself made headlines when he rescued two goats wandering on subway tracks in Brooklyn. The two rogues, named Billy and Willy now live in his animal sanctuary. [6]

Keep Reading: Pit Bull Dragged His 7-Month-Old Sister By Her Diaper Out Of The Family’s Burning Home

Sources

  1. “Jon Stewart, wife get OK for animal sanctuary, plan for opening.” NJ. Rob Spahr. January 11, 2017
  2. “Animal Rights.” Treehugger.
  3. “Take a Video Tour of Jon Stewart’s Colts Neck Farm.Patch. Carly Baldwin. January 12, 2017
  4. Jon Stewart and Other Stars Rescue Animals With Farm Sanctuary.” Parade. Nicola Bridges. June 23, 2017
  5. Fresh produce grown at Jon Stewart’s farm feeds hungry, and you can help.”  App. Ella Brockway. July 8, 2019
  6. “Comedian Jon Stewart rescues goats from New York subway tracks.” BBC. August 21, 2018
Sarah Biren
Freelance Writer
Sarah is a baker, cook, author, and blogger living in Toronto. She believes that food is the best method of healing and a classic way of bringing people together. In her spare time, Sarah does yoga, reads cookbooks, writes stories, and finds ways to make any type of food in her blender.
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